Termites and trees relationship

termites and trees relationship

A total of 26 species of termites were present in the of tree density and soil cover, and with the intensity of. Mutualism is a symbiotic relationship from which both organisms derive benefit. In some termite species, the microbial flora (bacteria and protists) of their. Organisms both cooperate and compete in ecosystems. When they have close and long-term interactions, their relationship is known as.

Symbiosis in the Forest

The coral receives nutrition from the the photosynthesis of the algae and the algae receives a protected environment and nutrients obtained by the coral.

This interaction has enabled coral reefs to be among the most productive of Earth's ecosystems. These ecosystems have a profound impact globally as sites of carbon dioxide absorption, energy production for larger oceanic ecosystems and as nurseries for many fish species.

Most animals have a diverse microbial flora within their digestive tracts. Humans, for example, have many mutually beneficial relationships with some of our intestinal microbiota.

termites and trees relationship

For instance, several species of Bacterioides and Escherichia are our principle source of vitamin K which is an essential factor involved in blood clotting. Other species have been shown to be important sources of some B vitamins, and recently one species of Bacterioides has been determined to be an essential component in the development of blood vessels of the small intestine.

Among all of the species known to science, none seem to stretch the boundaries of mutualism to the extent of that exhibited by the termites.

termites and trees relationship

Termite bodies are literally crammed full of various symbiotic organisms which are, in many cases, crammed full themselves with their own microbiota. To observe this firsthand, try this activity. Within the digestive tract of these termites is a diverse microbial world that has evolved along with the termites' ecologic role in the environment.

Termites, like most animals, lack the enzymes necessary to break down the principle components of plant tissues: How then do termites manage to survive on a diet of wood? Well, actually they don't, at least not directly.

What happens when a tree gets termites.

In the case of standing dead trees, size class II show the highest tree density, followed by size class I Table 1. This pattern was consistent across years.

The density of living trees associated with termites was higher in deciduous 0. Density of trees associated with termites in Chamela.

A Comparison of the density of living trees with termites in two habitats. B Comparison of the density of standing dead trees with termites in two habitats. Density values are reported as individuals per m2.

termites and trees relationship

Similar to living trees, the proportion of standing dead trees associated with termites was greater in than in Fig. Proportion of trees associated with termites in Chamela. A Comparison of the proportion of living trees with termites in two habitats. B Comparison of the proportion of standing dead trees with termites in two habitats.

Termite - Wikipedia

Values are the percentage of trees with termites. In general, the density of living and standing dead trees was significantly higher in size class II, followed by size class I, size class III and size class IV, in both habitats and years Figs. Distribution of the density of trees associated with termites in different diameter size classes in Chamela. A Density of living trees with termites in B Density of living trees with termites in C Density of standing dead trees with termites in D Density of standing dead trees in Diameter size classes are indicated by Roman numerals: Statistical analyses were performed for each year and Relationship between the density of trees associated with termites and the density of standing dead trees in Chamela.

Density was estimated as individuals per m2.

termites and trees relationship